Measuring success

Measuring the success of your positive parenting program allows you to check how you have gone against the objectives that you set at the start. 

You are required to specify at least two process and two impact/outcome measures for each program in your Community Action Plan.

Positive parenting programs may aim to influence outcomes relating to the child, parent, family or community. Some programs will address outcomes across a number of categories. For example, a program that teaches parents skills in playing with their child in order to improve a child’s listening skills would be categorised as having outcomes in relation to both child behaviour (child outcome) and parent-child relationship (family outcome)[1].

Some examples of the process and tools to measure the success of positive parenting programs are provided below. You may find these a useful starting point for measuring the impact or outcomes of your project.

Your measures of success should align with the objectives of your project.

Process measures • Number/type of community organisations engaged
• Number of positive parenting sessions
• Number/profile of parents who are reached
• Number and/or quality of resources and materials distributed
• Parent involvement in the project
• Satisfaction with session (parent, facilitator)
• Partners involved in planning the sessions.
Impact/Outcome measures • Impact on children
o Improvements in behaviour, skills, knowledge, learning or cognitive development, attitudes, confidence, safety.
• Impact on parent/s:
o Increase in parental skills, behaviours, knowledge, confidence, or changes in parent attitudes (e.g. knowledge of early-childhood development, parental mental health and wellbeing).
• Impact on families:
o Strengthening of parent-child relationships (e.g. positive interactions, consistency and reliability, attachment)
o Improvements in family relationships (e.g. positive family functioning, stability in parental relationship and relationships between other family members, and/or reductions in children’s exposure to conflict or family violence)
o Connection to wider familyand relatives
o Proactive family problem solving
o Family rituals/celebrations maintained or strengthened.
• Impact on community
o A Strengthening of social relationships and supports (e.g. connection to school and friends, connections to community, and connection to culture)
o Families’ community participation
• Impact on children
o Improvements in behaviour, skills, knowledge, learning or cognitive development, attitudes, confidence, safety.
• Impact on parent/s:
o Increase in parental skills, behaviours, knowledge, confidence, or changes in parent attitudes (e.g. knowledge of early-childhood development, parental mental health and wellbeing).
• Impact on families:
o Strengthening of parent-child relationships (e.g. positive interactions, consistency and reliability, attachment)
o Improvements in family relationships (e.g. positive family functioning, stability in parental relationship and relationships between other family members, and/or reductions in children’s exposure to conflict or family violence)
o Connection to wider familyand relatives
o Proactive family problem solving
o Family rituals/celebrations maintained or strengthened.
• Impact on community
o A Strengthening of social relationships and supports (e.g. connection to school and friends, connections to community, and connection to culture)
o Families’ community participation
Tools to measure success • Feedback sheets or questionnaires (pre and post)
• Surveys
• Interviews
• Verbal feedback from participants and facilitators
• Notes taken by a dedicated note taker
• Partnerships analysis
Please get in touch to find out more about the program
Please get in touch to find out more about the program